Dumb Ways to Die: a short commercial break from blues

Watch Dumb Ways To Die on the link below: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJNR2EpS0jw   Here’s a link to an interesting jingle aimed at saving young lives. Alternatively, it could be viewed as a waste of dosh by an organization with more money then sense. Whatever it is, it’s just another example of how Australia is becoming more and… Continue reading Dumb Ways to Die: a short commercial break from blues

It’s the first boogie woogie hit but is it rock & roll?

 BLUESMUSE24 In 1928, the former Ma Rainey and Butterbeans and Susie accompanist, Clarence ‘Pinetop’ Smith, recorded his renowned boogie piano track, Pinetop’s ‘Boogie Woogie’. A 24-year old Alabama comedian and piano player, Pinetop enjoyed one of the first-ever boogie hits with this number, which was hugely responsible for popularising the style we now know as… Continue reading It’s the first boogie woogie hit but is it rock & roll?

The Chuck Berry-style guitarist six years before Chuck Berry

BLUESMUSE22. TAKE A LISTEN ON THE LINK BELOW Updated and reformatted March 31st 2017 Chuck Berry (God bless him) is one of the finest lyricists known to rock & roll. Chuck also plays inimitable, dynamic, guitar-driven old-school rhythm & blues. Except Chuck’s style isn’t quite that inimitable. That’s because, in April 1949, sounding very much like the Chuck Berry… Continue reading The Chuck Berry-style guitarist six years before Chuck Berry

Why Lonnie Johnson was the most influential blues guitarist of all

“He (Lonnie) certainly had a presence: the blog points are well considered. Sadly, his grace and subtlety marginalized him.” @steviegurr May 19, 2015, California. “Thank you, Paul. I enjoyed reading the writing on Lonnie Johnson you wrote. I agree he and Big Bill get overlooked.” bryanhimes @bryanhimes June 20, 2013. While I can’t agree with the blues historians… Continue reading Why Lonnie Johnson was the most influential blues guitarist of all

This 16-year old white kid wrote the book on blues guitar

Before Muddy (Waters), before Buddy (Guy), before even Howlin’ Wolf, there was a white kid from Chicago’s outer suburbs recording electric blues guitar in the Windy City. His name was George Barnes and he was almost certainly the second guitarist ever to record electric blues commercially. And judging from the number of instruction manuals he brought out in… Continue reading This 16-year old white kid wrote the book on blues guitar

The English woman who sang the blues in 1799.

BLUESMUSE18 Johann Graupner The world’s first public performance of African-American-influenced music most probably occurred at the Federal Street Theatre, Boston, in 1799, but not quite in the manner the time-worn myth or Wikipedia portrays.  According to popular legend, one of the era’s leading classical musicians, the German oboist, Johann Christian Gottlieb Graupner, is said to… Continue reading The English woman who sang the blues in 1799.